Quincy Owens

Quincy Owens has built a life for himself surrounded by art. He has always loved creating things ever since he was a child, and he figured that he could manipulate and change them to make them more special. He has taken that principle to heart and that is still the core of what he does today.

You might have seen Quincy at ORANJE in past years (he’s been a participant six or seven times now), but his work this year is different that what you’ve experienced before. Though he still continues to create abstract paintings that focus on a balance between chaos and order, he’s been exploring materials, techniques and concepts over the past year. He has also been working on creating life-size and larger sculptures out of cardboard and reclaimed wood. “These are now getting fabricated into a larger scale and in permanent materials, such as stainless steel. I have also spent a majority of this year making 31 larger-than-humans-scale cardboard sculptures that are then coated in layers of fiberglass and pigmented epoxy resin that have speakers mounted on the inside. These are all for a huge installation on Calder Plaza for ArtPrize in Grand Rapids.”

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While the 31 sculpture installation at ArtPrize has been a highlight of the year for Quincy, you can find his work all over the place. He always has work at his studio (Studio 077) at the Harrison Center for the Arts, and they put his work in regular rotation throughout the building. If you shop on Mass Ave, you can find his handmade cufflinks at Silver in the City. He has coasters that are sold at Foundry Provisions. Outside of Indianapolis, he has work in Louisville, Cincinnati, Lafayette and Michigan.

Quincy is one of the few artists in ORANJE that is lucky enough to say that this is his full-time job (“although I don’t consider it a job”). He also supports himself through other artistic endeavors besides creating. He has recently started doing speaking engagements concerning art, creativity, faith and risk; he teaches pottery camps through the Indy YMCA summer programs and he hosts weekly camps in his studio. “I do my best to stay active and involved in the community in all sorts of ways.”

Like earlier mentioned, this isn’t Quincy’s first time at ORANJE. So why does he keep coming back for more? “I love ORANJE. It takes a commitment from all of the artsits and participants/spectators. It only happens one night of the year; either you showed up to experience it and be a part of it or you missed it. I love that. It’s a great place to catch artists and musicians at all sorts of stages in their careers. The atmosphere is very temporary and I think that encourages lower inhibitions/hesitations.”

Quincy used to think that he should inform his audience, and now that he is experienced in exhibiting his work, he’s realized that he might be taking this approach all wrong. “Come check out the work and let me know what YOU think about it. I already know what I think about it. People surprise me every day in the things they see within my art.”