Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia Spotlight: Cicada Parade

cicada paradeYou might have seen the members of Cicada Parade perform before, but never together like this.

Cicada Parade creates a collaborative performance using abstract art, dimensional concepts and audiovisual soundscapes to stimulate the senses. Members Mathew Milo, Christin Belcher and Angel Milo collaborate and overlap their different skill sets to create this new audio visual stimulation communication, which you can be one of the first to witness at Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia on Saturday, November 21.

How do you create your art/music? What is your creative process? We are building from experimentation.“I like to sit down and work hard on a new idea until I can make something beautiful that has potential. At this point, I continue working on the project until I beat it to death and then try desperately to revive it.” -Mathew Milo

What is your studio like? What else do you do on the side? Currently the Cicada Parade project is being built from within two separate private studios, with one leaning towards visual and the other in audio. Other projects vary from member to member with creative services for clients.

What are your future goals for your art/music? To provide a therapeutic outlet for people. ART/MUSIC: Make it. Share it.

What do you want us to know about your music, your art, or anything at all? A footprint is much like a rabbit, both enjoy designing cakes.

You can find out more information about Cicada Parade on their website and Facebook page, and don’t miss them on November 21! 

Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia Spotlight: Atarilogic

atarilogic-hiphop-producer5Creating traditional hip hop music and pop culture art, Noah Mattern started making loops on a guitar and an old drum machine a long time ago. Eventually, samplers and computers came into his life as his artwork continued to develop. “I grew up in the 80s, so a lot of my style is derived from the bright visual patterns and explosive musical style of the era.”

Mattern, the man behind Atarilogic, attributes much of his background to interacting with good people and learning from other creative types in all fields. “There are lots of stories there, but mainly the support and inspiration of others has guided much of my development in the art and music realm.”

Atarilogic has done gallery shows regionally and also performed musically on a national level. You might have seen him at ORANJE 2010 where he did an art installation. On top of his art and musical endeavors, he founded a design company called Maximumedia Design in Lafayette, Indiana. “The studio is a building I bought and turned into a minimal space with clean elements where I can get loud without waking my family or confusing the neighbors. It is also a large scale interactive installation I am changing constantly. By tweeting @MaxDesignOnline, the first 8 characters will display in our window. Fun!”

Can you tell us some information about your art/music? How would you describe it? I love dance music and fun, splashy synths as well as darker, minimal spaces. It is all a part of the experience. I explore experimentally and am most creative when I am able to take things to the extreme, stand right at the edge and jump.

Where do you find the inspiration for your project? I love good design and aesthetics. I like to merge haunted elements with lighter aspects of sound design – so, even my sappy instruments have a touch of static. I think this is all inspired by my mood and interaction with things around me, most powerfully film and location. Tight spaces produce an entirely different sensation than sweeping landscapes and are equally valuable in inspiring composition to me.

How do you create your art/music? What is your creative process? I dig vinyl and create sounds in my studio or on the road. I like to explore experimentally and let an arrangement take me where it will. Sometimes I have an iconic idea or a riff on an existing archetype or image. I will take that and develop it until my reaction is typically to smile or laugh. I hate to elevate my artwork more than I could without speaking about it, but I like Art that gets a reaction and if you can’t accept the existential humor in all things, you probably wouldn’t get my work. Even my darker or political work is challenging in its sense of humor.

What are your future goals for your art/music? To produce a visual style guide to my work so that other artists can recreate it without requiring my presence. It is a factory formula I think would be fun in an executive sense. I am also working on a novel and my music is becoming more thematic, less pop.

What are you most excited about for Synesthesia? What’s in store for us on November 21? I am excited to interact with the audience, to produce an audiovisual effect that will be interesting to them; perhaps making them think, dance or otherwise become a part of the overall experience. Plus, I will have FREE stickers! I have a total sensory package being readied for deployment. Did I mention FREE stickers?! See you there.

What should we know about you? I don’t take myself too seriously and neither should you. Mainly, the way you interact or interpret the world is Art. How you choose to announce that or otherwise depict or “pronounce” that is what makes you an artist, whether you are a videographer or a plumber. You define what Art is, not me.

Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia Spotlight: BrainTwins

BrainTwinsMeet Jessica Dunn and Justin Shimp, a collaborative art duo called BrainTwins. Together, they combine their explorations in analog and digital media to create experimental multimedia installations utilizing sound, animation, projection and sculpture.

Dunn, aka Sesseka, has a visual arts background in painting and sculpture and likes to do a lot of the art direction and work in analog media. Shimp has a background in video production, programming and audio. The duo met in 2011 and began collaborating, first by simply doodling together and slipping personalized notes in orders shipping out at Joyful Noise Recordings. From then on, they have found there are limitless ways to collaborate and evolve their creative process.

BrainTwins capture the essence of Synesthesia in their work by setting no limits on the types of media used in their projects, crossing over between animation, sculpture, sound and anything else they can get their hands on. You could consider these two “platform agnostics” discovering samples of the world around them, combining those samples, remixing, layering, editing…their creative process taking twists and turns all along the way.

Where do you find the inspiration for your project? Synesthesia is a phenomenon we both experience and is ongoing inspiration for our work along with other psychological and perceptual phenomena/illusions. Our work is a response and homage to sensory overload and how it transports our psyche into new, abstract spaces. We hope to provide gateways for viewers to step outside of their own preconceived constructs of the physical world and explore the hard to define territory deep in the unconscious mind.

Where can we find your works? In the past, we have shown some BrainTwins pieces at Installation Nation, Primary Colours, Tanjerine, and events with Big Car and General Public Collective. Music is a huge part of our lives so we do a lot of work with Musical Family Tree, record labels, and bands; making music videos, designing album covers, apparel, stage design, live projections, etc. A good place to check out our work is on our website where you can take a look at both commercial work and experimental stuff we’ve been doing lately.

Is this your full-time job? BrainTwins is our full time job and we have a studio space within a video production house. We balance design projects, animation work, story boarding, murals and other client work with the more experimental stuff. Our studio mainly consists of computers, Wacom tablets, samplers, programs, various instruments/art supplies and a somewhat organized file cabinet filled with thousands of drawings/frames of animation.

What are your future goals for your art/music? Our main goal is to continue to sustain our art projects and collaborate with even more artists. We have some concepts in the works that we’d like to see pan out in the near future such as a TV show, a video game and the creation of a larger studio/gallery space where we can create more environments and interactive films.

What are you most excited about for Synesthesia? Each of the participating artists in Synesthesia are so different, so it will be cool to see the various interpretations manifest in different sounds/forms throughout the night. Come check us out and hallucinate! You will see a lot…sometimes you won’t know what you’re looking at but you might feel a sensation that’s oddly specific.

Don’t miss BrainTwins at The Speak Easy for Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia on November 21!

Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia Spotlight: Mr. Kinetik

Mr. KinetikMr. Kinetik has been involved in music since he was a child playing with a plastic saxophone and guitar. And it’s no surprise that music has influenced his life since his parents have played instruments and his sister and aunt have been involved in the arts. In fact, his talented aunt even painted a mural on a wall at his grandparents’ house in Michigan City over 40 years ago.

With a Bachelors in Media Arts: Recording Industry Studies from Butler University, Kinetik is a not only a one-man band, but he’s also a public school educator working from K-12 in general education, special education and alternative education. His late great-grandfather was a member of a gospel quartet for close to 60 years even while working full-time, which has been his inspiration for staying with music.

No stranger to the art and music scene, Mr. Kinetik has been a former ORANJE participant three different times with two different projects. Now, as a participant in Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia, Mr. Kinetik will be creating sounds and music using different mediums. “I always liked to experiment with colors but really got more into it after college,” he said. “It became a way for me to channel other ideas and I always listen to music while I’m painting and just paint with the music.

Can you tell us some information about your art and music? How would you describe it? My art and music has always been a reflection of my moments in life; time capsules if you will, ways for me to remember what was going on. So with that my art and music has range because life has range. My art and music is about exploration and experimentation as well, seeing how far I can go with an idea or technique.

Where did you find the inspiration for your project? I wanted to do something that uses most of my background knowledge and abilities but introduced an element that is new. So there are parts of the project that I’ll test ahead of time but ultimately, the audience gets to experience it with me at its early stages.

What is your creative process? I start with an idea. Sometimes it’s just a word or a feeling. I design with the end in mind. Musically, I look at tones as a color spectrum. Lower tones are darker, higher tones are brighter. Some songs don’t need the whole spectrum, some just need flashes of certain colors. From there I can decide what instruments seem right to put into it. All of this happens very quickly otherwise I can get sidetracked. I like to work quickly.

What are your future goals for your art/music? I really want my music and art to reach further and engage more people. I really want to work with a symphony and get into scoring for films.

What are you most excited about for Synesthesia? I’m most excited to see a cool intersection of art, music and color. This is an event that really captures the beauty of all art and presents it to people. People should come see my performance because it will truly be one of a kind, from the art to the music.

Tell us something about your music that we should know. What’s in store for us on November 21? I do my best to be spontaneous and allow flow to dictate what I’m doing. I make boundaries but they’re way out and then I work inside of them using what I know and a little bit of what I don’t know. I love to improvise. The performance will be a flowing expression of music created in layers and the art that coincides with the music. I’m really excited to share with everyone. It will be a lot of fun.

You can find more music from Mr. Kinetik at MrKinetik.bandcamp.com. Don’t miss him at The Speak Easy for Red Bull House of Art Synesthesia on November 21!

Want a Free Ticket to ORANJE?

This year, ORANJE will be hosting a new lounge for all the music-lovers out there. We can’t give you all the details (we want to surprise you!) but in order for this lounge to work, we need some items to be donated.

For each usable piece of furniture donated, we will reward the donator with a free ticket to ORANJE! And since we like to help out others, all of the gently used furniture will be donated to charity after ORANJE.

Here is what we’re looking for:

  • 18+ banquet tables (6′x2′)
  • 3+ “point of sale counters”
  • 200+ milk crates. These need to have an interior width of 13″, or big enough to hold records. These will be returned after the event, if requested.
  • 11+ couches
  • 8+ large rugs
  • 4+ end tables
  • 3+ coffee tables
  • Lava lamps…lots of them.
  • Tapestries (tie-dyed, nonsensical patterns welcome)
  • Posters (old, obscure band posters preferred)

Please email mike@oranjeindy.com if you can donated any of these items, and we can’t wait to unveil our new lounge on September 13!

 

Steven Schubert

You might have seen his work at local businesses such as Homespun, LUNA, Artifacts, Indy Reads or The Funk Yard. His localized, city-specific works of art go hand in hand with the “shop local” movement that has hit Indy, and with a price point that can fit into anyone’s budget, you have to pick up some of his work if you love your city.

Steven Schubert is a Spanish Instructor at Butler by day with an artistic focus on Midwestern metropolises by night. He is a self-taught photographer with no formal training in art. “I thought that graphic design would be a way to use some of the skills I learned in photography, such as composition and color,  and apply them to my own creations.  Inspiration is the primary requirement, once you have that you’ll go out and learn the tools you need to make that art a reality.”

Steven designs posters, cards and postcards using various styles, drawing upon vintage pop art, political art, nostalgic references and a feeling that is true to our urban spaces. His designs look at aging cities, working class roots, signature architecture and the gritty elegance of our urban legacy.

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Created at home and then digitally printed, some of Steven’s designs range from $2-$20 (unframed). “My experiences in the city inspire me. If I see a praying mantis in my backyard, I use that image. If I see impressive architectural design, I incorporate it into my art. It’s quite random, really. There is always an endless supply of motifs and styles to work with in the fabric of Indianapolis, or any city in fact.”

Steven wants to share his love of Indianapolis to the local residents and beyond. “I have modest goals for my designs.  I want to get them into as many hands as possible, and also to people who are not in Indianapolis so they can form a positive impression of the city.  I think other cities know we are up-and-coming and postcards or cards that look attractive and connect to Indianapolis will help get the word out we’re not Naptown anymore.”

His designs don’t hold to a specific aesthetic. Steven jumps around in different styles to see what works best for Indianapolis, or Cincinnati or even Detroit. In doing this, he makes different styles of images that different people would enjoy. “I want people of all ages and orientations to find something they like.”

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While Steven has attended ORANJE in the past, this will be his first time as a participant. “I have attended Oranje once a few years back. The DJ dance floor was fantastic, and I had a blast seeing Beta Male; they kicked ass. I remember it as a exciting blur mostly, I must admit. I like the idea that Oranje is a night of urban madness, art and music that feels metropolitan and connected with global youth culture. You can’t have something like this in the Hoosier hinterland – you know you’re in the city when you walk through the gates.”

You can find Steven’s work on Etsy or at Indygenous, and make sure to check him out on September 13!

Erin Livingston

Take a pause from your daily digital grind for a few minutes and open your mind. It is then that you can create new understandings or spark a long lost memory. This is what Erin Livingston with Poetry on Demand asks of her audience.

“My job as an artist is to merely facilitate the experience and present you with a tangible work of poetry that is absolutely dependent upon collaboration. Poetry on Demand provides each patron with the opportunity to interact with the artist at the moment of creation in ways that other mediums might not allow. In this way patrons have significant input on the genesis of each piece and make it a true collaboration.”

ErinLivingston1

Erin went to school to become a music educator, and instead left with a degree in Anthropology. Somewhere along the way, she fell in love with the Beat Generation. Now, she stands with her typewriters and thousands of miles logged on Greyhounds with hundreds of stages under her feet. “I enjoy talking to people, writing and traveling. Poetry has allowed me to do all of these things. In order to do poetry, I have held every job under the sun. My resume for the art I make today is a patchwork quilt of lived experience, and I wouldn’t change a single stitch.”

Poetry on Demand is a way to make poetry accessible in a fun and personal way. Strangers must trust Erin with snapshots of their personal lives while she translates the experience of the exchanges into poems that are unique and meaningful. POD celebrates the art of active listening and returns value to face-to-face conversation between two strangers.

“In a time when we can polish our self-presentation online and communicate in heavily edited text day in and day out, the act of live and unscripted conversations between strangers serves to slow us down, if only for a moment. Producing the final poem via an antique Royal typewriter, a medium void of delete keys and copy/edit shortcuts, makes each work I create an intentional celebration of all our beautiful imperfections.”

PODFlyerErin has an impressive resume with a wide range of gigs. She is a former Slam Master of the Indianapolis Poetry Slam and former curator of the live, theme-based variety show The Encyclopedia Show at The Irving Theater. If you want to find her work online, it is available at the Indiefeed Poetry Podcast. Currently, she is collaborating with Adam Henze on The Power of a Sentence, a series of writing workshops at the Indiana Women’s Prison. You can also catch her in Warsaw on August 15 at Funny HaHa or Funny Strange. If you live in Bloomington, stop by the Fourth Street Art Festival on August 30-21, where Erin is the Assistant Executive Director of the Spoken Word Stage.

This will be Erin’s first year as an ORANJE participant. “What excites me the most about ORANJE is the scale of the event. I’m excited to be sharing space with so many other talented artists that I might not otherwise get to see, which is a great reason for anyone to attend.”

You can find Erin on September 13 on the the lower level of the building.

“The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars…” -Jack Kerouac

Ewokie Talkie

Evansville-based Ewokie Talkie is bringing his atmospheric, dreamy beat-based music to ORANJE on September 13, and we’re excited to share his passion and talent with you. The man behind Ewokie Talkie, Kyle Stallings, has a sounds as eclectic as his music tastes, including jazz, rock, hip hop and various dance beats.

Ewokie Talkie

Making music since he was 14 years old, Stallings started out his music career playing the guitar in bands. After a few years, he began exploring his interest in hip hop by attempting to make his own beats. “I started acquiring a lot of records (that I sampled from) as well as purchasing my first synthesizer. i got into using a computer for more control and from then on, I haven’t stopped. I’ve been making music and performing as Ewokie Talkie for four years.”

If you live in Indianapolis, you might not be familiar with Ewokie Talkie unless you caught his show at The Mousetrap last year. Or perhaps you were one of the attendees of a house party he played along with David Peck, Digital Dots are more, which Stallings said has been his favorite show in Indy to date. Ewokie Talkie performs at least once a month, whether it’s in St. Louis at The Blank Space, in Chicago for Push Beats Mondays or in Evansville’s local art gallery/venue/restaurant known as PG, where Stallings also helps book and promote events.

“Actually my favorite show was also the one that had the largest attendance. I got to open up for Parisian and Lapalux in St. Louis. Lapalux is one of my favorite artists so I guess I would also say that it was my best performance because I took a lot of time to prepare for it.”

Don’t miss out on your chance to see Ewokie Talkie for his first appearance at ORANJE on September 13. “I plan to perform in the usual way that I play off of my shows. I’ll be playing original music of mine with my laptop and midi controller. I will also be bringing handmade cassettes with new music as well as download codes inside the tape boxes for digital downloads. Events like this bring people together and encourage progression. Aside from that, it will be a lot of fun.”

We asked Stallings about his future plans for Ewokie Talkie. “I make music because I enjoy it and hopefully people will like it. I don’t really have an ultimate goal. I’ve sort of just accepted that I enjoy this too much to ever just stop. Everything that happens along the way is secondary to how I feel when i’m just sitting my space creating.”

You can keep up with Ewokie Talkie on Facebook and Soundcloud. If you want to see him after ORANJE, he’ll be playing a show on September 19th in St. Louis for an event called “Brave New World” that is put on by a collective called Far Fetched, and releasing an EP soon after with the collective.